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[greenyes] what if "private for-profit" meant a 10% return?


Greetings all,

Just want to share a recent article I read that supported an idea that
I?ve been espousing for years at conferences, but have never gone
national with it on this listserve. Here it is in a nutshell: the
discard industry in the USA has built itself into a giant $44 Billion
dollar per year enterprise, most of that going to the haul-to-landfill
folks. My experience of competing with these folks is that they are
making a LOT of profit. My idea is that we create a new kind of
?private sector? to lead the world toward Zero Waste? a private sector
that offers an ?open book, 10% profit? contract to our communities.
It?s a bit like the ?regulated utilities? that provide many of us with
electricity.

The reason I propose this is because it supports the best of the
entrepreneurial spirit in us while channeling it within social goals.
It would result in the creation of an army of ?green entrepreneurs? in
pursuit of $4.4 billion in profits, and that ain?t chicken feed.

Am I dreaming or could this approach be successful in mainstream
America?

Eric Lombardi
Eco-Cycle


Morley calls for greater PFI role in waste management
Published on 5-Nov-2004
URL: http://www.edie.net/news/news_story.asp?id=9132

Environment Minister Elliot Morley highlighted the increasingly
important role of the private sector in providing more effective and
efficient waste solutions, this week.

Speaking at Defras Investment Opportunities: Municipal Waste and PFI
conference Mr Morley said the challenges ahead in waste management could
open the door to a £10 billion investment opportunity for the private
sector.
Waste management represents a key environmental challenge for the UK.
It is an area in which spending has grown and is set to continue to grow
significantly in the coming years. This is reflected in the extent to
which waste is being pushed up the political agenda, both locally,
nationally and internationally, Mr Morley said. This growth in demand
needs to be mirrored by development of the private sector capacity, with
greater investment in the collection, management and disposal of waste.
Increasingly this can be achieved through the Private Finance
Initiative.
He went on to say that there was clear evidence of a growing demand for
PFI from local authorities, with nine waste projects having been signed
already, and a further seven in procurement.
We are aware that issues such as planning application delays and public
concern over health can form barriers that prevent private sector
investors from getting involved in waste management projects. However,
we have confidence in our current policies for local authorities to
press ahead urgently with the planning applications for new waste
management facilities in line with the new emphasis on minimisation,
re-use and recycling, as opposed to landfill, Mr Morley said.
The UK has the worst waste disposal record in Europe, with 80% of
municipal solid waste going to landfill. The Landfill Directive requires
the volume of biodegradable waste to be reduced to 75% of 1995 levels by
2010 and 35% by 2020. The Strategy Unit report Waste Not Want Not
estimated that the infrastructure investment needed to meet these
targets is around £600 million to £700 million per year for the next ten
years.
By David Hopkins

© Faversham House Group Ltd 2004. edie news articles may be copied or
forwarded for individual use only. No other reproduction or distribution
is permitted without prior written consent.


Eric Lombardi
Executive Director
Eco-Cycle, Inc
Boulder, CO
303-444-6634
www.ecocycle.org


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