GreenYes Archives

[GreenYes Home] - [Thread Index] - [Date Index]
[Date Prev] - [Date Next] - [Thread Prev] - [Thread Next]


[GreenYes] Re: Measuring State Recycling Rates


Title: [GreenYes] Re: Measuring State Recycling Rates

I also agree that it is hard to make comparisons, but at least when we
survey the states and the District of Columbia, we ask how the
information is derived to give the reader of our report (mostly those
corporate types) the tools they need to make their own conclusions. We
also incorporate a table legislation so that people can see how other
states do it. I don't know if other organizations take the time to
make those distinctions in their reports, but they are important ones.
If anyone can come up with something else they would like to see
incorporated to better explain these differences and definitions, let
me know. We're working on the next survey now.

Kim

On 9/19/07, Alan Muller <amuller@no.address> wrote:
> At 06:28 AM 9/19/2007 -0400, Pat Franklin wrote:
>
>
> >RE:  State Recycling Rates
> >
> >Comparing state recycling rates is never an apples-to-apples comparison and
> >should be avoided.
>
> Pat:
>
> Yes,  I agree.  But:  if somebody with a potential interest asks me,
> and I respond with something like "it's hard to really know..." or
> "our 'recycling' rate is between 4% and 60% depending on definitions
> and who you are talking to ...." they are likely to lost interest,
> especially if they are corporate or "policy" types attuned to the
> idea that nothing can be taken seriously if not measured.
>
> What do you suggest?
>
> Alan
>
> >  First off, it is highly unlikely that one would ever
> >find two states that measure exactly the same items. One state might include
> >construction debris, or automobiles, while most states do not include these
> >items. Secondly, state "A" might include imported items (aluminum cans for
> >example) that were generated in state "B" but recycled in state "A".  This
> >happens (with aluminum cans in fact) at the national level.  Cans sold and
> >collected in Canada are recycled in the US.  Both Canada and the US count
> >them as "recycled" cans, when in fact, only Canada should take credit for
> >recycling since they were generated there.
> >
> >Bottom line.....don't put any credence in overall state recycling rates.
> >
> >Pat Franklin
> >patfarrellfranklin@no.address
> >
> >
> >*************************************************************
> >
> >
> >-----Original Message-----
> >From: GreenYes@no.address [mailto:GreenYes@no.address] On Behalf
> >Of Kim Leslie
> >Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 8:21 AM
> >To: David Biddle
> >Cc: amy perlmutter; greenyes
> >Subject: [GreenYes] Re: Environmental awareness
> >
> >
> >Of course there's also the survey of the states we do which provides
> >recycling rates. We last conducted it in 2005 so the numbers would be
> >for 2004 if I remember right. We will be working on the next survey
> >which would give you 2006 (maybe 2007) numbers.
> >
> >That may be helpful.
> >
> >Kim Leslie
> >Raymond Communications
> >301-518-0215
> >
> >On 9/18/07, David Biddle <Dbiddle@no.address> wrote:
> > >
> > >  There must be something you can use at the GreenBiz.com site. Try:
> > > http://www.greenbiz.com/toolbox/reports.cfm
> > >
> > >  --
> > >  David Biddle, Executive Director
> > >  <http://www.blueolives.blogspot.com>
> > >  Greater Philadelphia Commercial Recycling Council
> > >  P.O. Box 4037
> > >  Philadelphia, PA 19118
> > >
> > >  215-247-3090 (desk)
> > >  215-432-8225 (cell)
> > >
> > >  <http://www.gpcrc.com>
> > >
> > >  Read In Business magazine to learn about sustainable
> > >  businesses in communities across North America!
> > >  Go to: <http://www.jgpress.com/inbusine.htm>
> > >
> > >
> > >  on 9/17/07 4:39 PM, amy perlmutter at amy@no.address wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > > Thanks, David.  Actually, what I am looking for are some statistics to
> >back
> > > up what businesses leaders have told me in some focus groups I have been
> > > running on clean tech: that one of the draws of doing business in Ma is
> > > heightened awareness and understanding of environmental issues. It's
> > > interesting how many business people have said that.  So I was thinking
> >that
> > > could perhaps be illustrated through documenting behavior (Ma recycling
> >rate
> > > compared to other states- not sure what else I can find to illustrate
> > > behavior), or some sort of survey about environmental attitudes or
> >awareness
> > > that might compare states or regions.   I'll look at the mackower piece.
> >I
> > > welcome any other suggestions.  I'm looking for something that's less than
> >5
> > > years old, preferably relatively recent.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >  On 9/17/07 4:31 PM, "David Biddle" <Dbiddle@no.address> wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > > Amy-
> > >
> > >  Check out this Joel Makower blog entry that I received today:
> > > http://makower.typepad.com/joel_makower/2007/09/whats-behind-th.html
> > > He makes reference to the Green Gauge reports. You might want to follow
> >the
> > > links in the article.
> > >
> > >  The book "Breakthrough" by Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus, the
> > > authors of infamous essay "The Death of Environmentalism," feel the same
> > > thing Makower does, i.e., that opinion surveys about environmental
> >awareness
> > > are rather specious. There's a lot of evidence for this and S&N provide
> >some
> > > in their book. People say they are concerned about the environment when
> >you
> > > ask them, but at the same time more generally when asked what the top 10
> > > issues are that concern them, most folks don't even put the environment on
> > > their list.
> > >
> > >  Obviously you're after very specific info on recycling type awareness,
> >but
> > > I'm not sure how much value there is in it. This helps you not at all, I
> > > know. Sorry.
> > >
> > >  Db
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >  >
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> >>
>




[GreenYes Home] - [Date Index] - [Thread Index]
[Date Prev] - [Date Next] - [Thread Prev] - [Thread Next]