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Re: [greenyes] Re: film recycling


Mike-

This recycling game (and composting) takes a helluvalot of commitment and
diligence?and money. If you¹re interested in composting as a career, I¹m
sure there are a few companies in the Eugene area that you can turn to to
learn the ropes. If not, you may want to try a large waste service company
and learn their ropes and see if you can push them in your direction. After
a few years, you¹ll see where you need to take things.

There¹s no question that business development is a risky, time consuming
proposition. But anything¹s possible with the right person who is dedicated
and thorough. Dan W. speaks the truth. He has built himself quite a unique
and successful enterprise through, I¹m sure, insanely hard work and a deep
commitment to his vision. If you believe in what you want to do, make it
happen by taking baby steps.

You ask ³how come its not a reality?² I¹m not sure about where you live, but
it is a reality in many places around the country. Read Biocycle, In
Business, (http://www.jgpress.com) Resource Recycling
(http://www.resource-recycling.com), and other magazines. There¹s some
amazing stuff going on throughout North America. Yes, the big status quo
corporate and institutional players are tough nuts to crack and hard to
compete with, but there¹s no end to what you can do with intelligence and
commitment.

Good luck in all that you do.

David Biddle, Executive Director


P.O. Box 4037
Philadelphia, PA 19118
215-247-3090
215-432-8225 (mobile)
Dbiddle@no.address

<WWW.GPCRC.COM>

Read In Business magazine to learn about sustainable
businesses in communities across North America!
Go to: <http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/jgpress/>

on 5/15/05 11:28 PM, Mike Morin at mikemorin@no.address wrote:

>> >In regards to "one of the problems with Capitalism". If my idea will not
>> work, then I should fail and lose my investment; that is the beauty and great
>> >wisdom of Capitalism. That is why successful entrepreneurs and businesses do
>> their homework and learn all they can about product viability before >huge
>> investments are made. In my need for funding, whether public or private, even
>> more scrutiny should be (and would be) given to the idea. >Rarely does any
>> product or business succeed without great commitment of research, money, time
>> and effort.
>
> There is very little to no wisdom in the modus operandi of Capitalism.
> Corporate Conglomerate Capitalists are at a distinct advantage to your
> so-called mythical "entrepreneurs". Like I wrote in my previous post, some
> individuals can take the risk and do the homework. Most folks can't. So what
> we're left with is a society where rich corporations control the land grant
> (e.g. Ohio State University) and other educational institutions and use their
> wealth to fatten their minority holdings at the expense of the many.
>
> That is not even to mention the externalities that the CCC's eschew. What I
> proposed along the lines of recycling organic waste would be beneficial to do.
> How come it is not a reality?
>
> What are the realities with respect to recycling efforts? Dare I mention the
> need to reduce and reuse?
>
>
> Working for peace and cooperation,
>
> Mike Morin
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: Dan Weisenbach <mailto:dan@no.address>
>>
>> To: greenyes@no.address
>>
>> Sent: Sunday, May 15, 2005 1:24 PM
>>
>> Subject: [greenyes] Re: film recycling
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> "film" as we refer to it in recycling, means thin flexible plastic; as
>> opposed to rigid containers. Plastic grocery bags, retail bags, stretch wrap
>> (used on shipping pallets -- basically the same stuff as Saran Wrap),
>> plastic mailing envelopes (both LDPE and HDPE -- a.k.a. Tyvek) and many
>> flexible food packages are examples of recyclable plastic film. Rigid
>> containers made of HDPE (#2) and LDPE (#4) plastics have a higher melt point
>> and must normally be recycled separately from film products of the same
>> polymer.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> "Photographic Film" is actually polyester; as are the plastic printing
>> plates that we use on our offset printing presses, shiny metallic balloons,
>> many potato chip bags, and thousands of other photographic and packaging
>> uses. Polyester film *can* be recycled, although it might be considered a
>> contaminant in a load of grocery bags and stretch film.
>>
>>
>> Polyester film is PET, yes like beverage bottles. For recycling, PET film is
>> not compatible with PET containers.
>>
>>
>> Side note: "Mylar" is DuPont's brand name for their polyester film used in
>> various types of packaging.
>>
>>
>> In lieu of recycling, the energy in PET film can be recovered when the film
>> is used as fuel (our printing plates along with our waste inks are burned in
>> a cement kiln used in the production of concrete).
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> I will find out how important it is for PET film to be separated from HDPE
>> and LDPE when recycled into plastic lumber products.
>>
>>
>> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> --------
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> In regards to "one of the problems with Capitalism". If my idea will not
>> work, then I should fail and lose my investment; that is the beauty and
>> great wisdom of Capitalism. That is why successful entrepreneurs and
>> businesses do their homework and learn all they can about product viability
>> before huge investments are made. In my need for funding, whether public or
>> private, even more scrutiny should be (and would be) given to the idea.
>> Rarely does any product or business succeed without great commitment of
>> research, money, time and effort. When I helped develop the Recycling
>> Market Development Grants here in Ohio, we purposefully structured a $
>> matching requirement for the requesting entities. The approval process
>> involves both the public and private sector to study the viability. As it
>> should be. One of the most useful and productive roles of government is to
>> assist businesses -- or just stay out of the way. The American form of
>> Capitalism is the most productive and successful structure in the history of
>> mankind.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Every day I risk all that I own, the well-being of my family, and the
>> livelihood of all my employees, to pursue a dream.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Responsibly,
>>
>>
>> Dan Weisenbach
>>
>>
>> www.RecycledProducts.com <http://www.RecycledProducts.com>
>>
>>
>> Columbus, Ohio
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, 15 May 2005 11:33:14 -0700, Mike Morin wrote:
>> I don't know what you're referring to when you
>>> > say plastic film. Isn't photo-chemical processing obsolete? Anyways,
>>> > your query makes me think of one of the problems with Capitalism.
>>> > That is, unless you can afford to lose it, you probably shouldn't
>>> > take the risk. Some people can afford it, most can't.
>>> > Working for peace and cooperation,
>>> > Leland in Eugene
>>> > MM
>>>> >> ----- Original Message -----
>>>> >> From: Dan Weisenbach
>>>> >> To: greenyes@no.address ; Samantha MacBride
>>>> >> Sent: Sunday, May 15, 2005 11:06 AM
>>>> >> Subject: [greenyes] post-consumer, bag & film recycling
>>>> >>
>>>> >>
>>>> >> I am designing a re-usable container for the household or office
>>>> >> collection of plastic film for recycling. My prototype has a
>>>> >> small, one-way opening to stuff bags and plastic film so it
>>>> >> compacts as you fill the container (patent pending). This could
>>>> >> be used for residential curbside collection (with container
>>>> >> exchange), office building recycling programs, and/or the
>>>> >> container could be mailed/shipped to a recycler. All I need now
>>>> >> is funding to make this system a reality. Please let me know if
>>>> >> this is of any interest to your communities. I would love to
>>>> >> take this project to next steps!
>>>> >>
>>>> >> Dan Weisenbach
>>>> >> www.RecycledProducts.com
>>>> >> Columbus, Ohio
>>
>









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