GreenYes Archives
[GreenYes Home] - [Thread Index] - [Date Index]
[Date Prev] - [Date Next] - [Thread Prev] - [Thread Next]

Re: [GreenYes] Computer Recycling
Hi,
A few years ago a 386 or 486 PC was considered to be top of the line and
powerful. Today even Pentium 200 MHz are considered useless and are being
consigned to the scrap heap. Most of these computers are in good working
order, and could easily work for several years more. They are being junked,
as they cannot run the latest Microsoft, or other commercial software's.

I am working on an Open Source based business software (ERP and CRM) for
small and medium sized businesses (10-50 users). It has features like those
available in SAP, Peoplesoft, Oracle etc.and has been designed for global
implementation, with multi-currency, language and accounting etc. It has
been downloaded over 400,000 times from the internet. Is suitable for people
on the wrong side of the digital divide, around the world (including smaller
businesses in the developed countries). It can use Pentium II/Celeron 200
MHz and above PCs, as user PCs, and with today's Pentium 4's, as servers,
for this software.

Using Open Source software (free/in-expensive) and re-cycled/salvaged
computers we can develop affordable IT solutions and  extend the benefits of
the IT revolution to all corners of the globe. It would give benefits to
all, less/no scrapping, affordable IT solutions etc.

I would be interested in collaborating with interested people for
implementing a plan to salvage, transport and use these computers, rather
than scrapping/re-cycling them.

Thanks,

Vipen Mahajan

Vipen.Mahajan@no.address

vmahajan@no.address



----- Original Message -----
From: "jholt" <jholt@no.address>
To: <mb198@no.address>; "Michael & Susan Kramer"
<mkramer@no.address>
Cc: "GRRN list serve" <greenyes@no.address>; "sid morris"
<smorris38@no.address>
Sent: Monday, February 03, 2003 12:08 PM
Subject: RE: [GreenYes] Computer Recycling


> My company does e-cycling for Dell and HP, among others.  We also recycle
> wooden crates, pallets, loose wood, corrugated plastic, tyvek garments and
> on and on.  With e-cylcing, though, we de-manufacture the (let's say) mini
> tower to it's smallest component, like a screw.  Then we can bale or shred
> only aluminum, only ABS plastics of the same color, etc.
>
> Jean Ann Holt
> Sr. Project Manager, Recycling Division
> jholt@no.address
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: mb198@no.address [mailto:mb198@no.address]
> Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 6:40 AM
> To: Michael & Susan Kramer
> Cc: GRRN list serve; sid morris
> Subject: Re: [GreenYes] Computer Recycling
>
>
>
>
>
>
> I have copied Sid Morris of  Electronic Products Recycling (EPR) in to
this
> memo. Sid can tell you more.
>
>
> Mark Bartlett
> Canadian Auto Workers
> Environmental Specialist
> DaimlerChrysler Windsor Assembly Plant
> Ph-519-561-9405 (T/L 833-9405)
> Fax-519-259-4664
>
>
>
>
>                       Michael & Susan
>                       Kramer                   To:       GRRN list serve
> <greenyes@no.address>
>                       <mkramer@no.address        cc:
>                       com>                     Subject:  [GreenYes]
Computer
> Recycling
>
>                       01/27/2003 11:21
>                       PM
>
>
>
>
>
>
> I noticed the following from Waste Age Wire:
> "EPA Challenges Corporations to Help Recycle Electronics Washington --
> The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has accelerated the drive
> toward a multi-corporation approach to electronic recycling (e-cycling)
> in the United States by launching its Plug-In to Recycling Campaign, a
> partnership with several
> electronics manufacturers.  The goal of the campaign, which was
> announced at the Consumer Electronics Show, held Jan. 9 through 12 in
> Las Vegas, was the  launch site for the EPA's is to increase the
> national recycling rate from 30 percent to 35 percent and to cut the
> generation of 30 harmful chemicals by 2005. Dell, Sony Corp., Panasonic
> and AT&TWireless are among the early supporters of the EPA's recycling
> drive, and selected Best Buy stores will create drop-off sites for some
> electronics. According to Dell's Web site, the company will take back
> any brand of computer for recycling."
>
> I looked up Dell and Sony to get their specific info on their recycling
> program.  Has anyone out there ever investigated the electronic/computer
> companies recycling programs, if there are any.  Since my community does
> not recycle computers ( presently at least), it would be beneficial to
> know of programs available so that indivduals could recycle if so
> inclined...
> Any input is appreciated.  Thanks.
> Susan Kramer
> Pinedale, Wyoming
> mkramer@no.address
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To unsubscribe, e-mail: greenyes-unsubscribe@no.address
> For additional commands, e-mail: greenyes-help@no.address
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To unsubscribe, e-mail: greenyes-unsubscribe@no.address
> For additional commands, e-mail: greenyes-help@no.address
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To unsubscribe, e-mail: greenyes-unsubscribe@no.address
> For additional commands, e-mail: greenyes-help@no.address
>





[GreenYes Home] - [Date Index] - [Thread Index]
[Date Prev] - [Date Next] - [Thread Prev] - [Thread Next]