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[GreenYes] Fwd: Post - World Summit Reports

>From: Bryan Ashe <bryan@mweb.co.za>
>Date: Mon, 9 Sep 2002 10:11:19 +0200
>
>some interesting websites for monitoring what is emerging out of WSSD and 
>for all the press that you missed during the summit.
>
>www.iol.co.za worldsummit site
>
>www.allafrica.com or wwww.sustainble.allafrica.com
>
>www.mg.co.za mail & guardian online summit website
>
>www.joburgplus10.org
>-------------------------
>Kofi Annan, UN secretary-general:
>This summit has instigated global action among a wide range of actors and 
>makes sustainable development a reality. The summit will put us on a path 
>that reduces poverty while protecting the environment. Governments have 
>agreed on an impressive range of concrete commitments and actions that 
>will make a real difference to people around the world. Conferences like 
>this cannot produce miracles... Johannesburg is a beginning, and if we 
>keep the momentum and pressure on the stakeholders, I believe the 
>conference will have made a major contribution.
>
>Dr Vandana Shiva (Indian author, physicist and activist):
>What happened in Joburg amounts to a privatisation of the Earth... an
>auction house in which the rights of the poor were given away.
>
>World Wide Fund for Nature International:
>Overall disappointed, but progress in some areas, notably water and
>sanitation, and in fisheries.
>
>Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa:
>A failure as regard any significant advances on the 1992 Earth Summit in 
>Rio de Janeiro, but... a few successes mixed in.
>
>Friends of the Earth International:
>A failure. Only two new and specific targets: on sanitation and establishing
>marine protected reserves. Otherwise existing commitments reaffirmed... a 
>clear step backwards from the Convention on Biological Diversity.
>
>European Trade Union Confederation:
>An imbalance between the importance given to trade and the lack of
>recognition given to the social and environmental dimension.
>
>Oxfam:
>The WSSD is an opportunity wasted... a triumph for greed and 
>self-interest, a tragedy for the poor and the environment.
>
>National Wildlife Federation:
>We are deeply disappointed in the Bush administration's approach to the
>plan... the same colluding industries who are favoured in Washington were
>favoured in Joburg.
>
>NGO Energy and Climate Caucus:
>The agreement on energy is an outright disaster, with the dropping of all
>targets and timetables.
>
>The Business Council for Sustainable Energy:
>Disappointed at the lack of substantial direction provided by the world
>leaders.
>
>Muriel Saragoussi (Brazilian Forum of Social Movements):
>Our governments have shamed us.
>
>Liz Hosken (The Gaia Foundation, London):
>What should have been an Earth summit has been infiltrated and taken over 
>by trade. The Johannesburg Plan is an incredibly weak agreement.
>
>Axel Naersted (Norwegian Forum for Environment and Development):
>The Norwegian government and a few others did an excellent job but the 
>only victory was to prevent the... World Trade Organisation taking over...
>completely.
>
>Senator Bob Brown (Australian Greens):
>Like ostriches, the wealthy nations have stuck their heads into the sand 
>and have let down the next generation in an appalling way. - Own Correspondents
>
>----------------------------------------
>Blueprint to save the Earth
>
>This is a summary of some of the goals and targets in the plan, which is
>designed to make a reality the World Summit's goals of poverty eradication 
>and environmental protection.
>
>Each goal has been assessed by a team of Independent Newspapers in
>Johannesburg and London, according to the following key:
>
>Assessment key:
>1 - Serious retreat
>2 - A backward step
>3 - Essentially no change/disappointing/unknown
>4 - Small gain
>5 - Significant achievement
>
>WATER AND SANITATION
>
>Agreement:
>
>Halve the proportion of people without safe drinking water and adequate
>sanitation by 2015. 5
>
>How it was reached:
>
>The main opposition to this commitment came from the United States, but, 
>as the week went on, it became more and more isolated, with allies on 
>other contentious issues - like the Opec countries, Canada, Japan and even 
>the big business lobby - calling for the target to be agreed.
>
>In the end the US was forced to give in.
>
>The deal was welcomed by many development charities as marking an 
>important step towards preventing more than 2-million deaths a year from 
>diseases caused by people drinking dirty water.
>
>It completes plans laid out in the United Nations' 2000 Millennium
>Declaration to halve, by 2015, the number of people - more than a billion -
>who are unable to reach, or afford, safe drinking water.
>
>Will it make a difference?
>
>Yes, if nations act now to implement what they have promised to do. It 
>could drastically cut the number of people, mainly children, who die 
>because they drink polluted water.
>
>HEALTH
>
>Agreements:
>
>A World Trade Organisation accord on patents should not prevent poor
>countries providing medicines to all. 3
>
>Reduce HIV prevalence in young men and women aged 15 to 24 by 25 percent 
>in affected countries by 2005 and globally by 2010. 3
>
>How it was reached:
>
>The sticking point was the issue of women's reproductive rights,
>particularly a paragraph calling for better health services "consistent with
>national laws and cultural and religious values".
>
>Some countries feared the wording could endorse the practice of genital
>mutilation.
>
>Eventually the summit compromised on a text on women's reproductive health 
>which satisfied concerns that it was a human right but could not be
>interpreted as promoting abortion.
>
>Will it make a difference?
>
>The patents clause is key because of the unaffordability of Aids drugs. 
>This is an issue over which South Africa went to court.
>
>Other agreements:
>
>Develop programmes to reduce by two-thirds the mortality rates for infants 
>and children by 2015, and reduce preventable deaths among children, 
>particularly girls.
>
>AGRICULTURE AND FISHING
>
>The agreements:
>
>Cease destructive fishing practices and establish marine protected areas 
>and networks by 2012. 5
>
>Maintain or restore fish stocks to levels that can be sustainably harvested
>by not later than 2015. 5
>
>How it was reached:
>
>The first significant deal of the summit. It means all countries will be
>responsible for reversing declines in fish stocks or maintaining them at a
>healthy level.
>
>But environmentalists said the deal was a classic example of "too little,
>too late". Fish stocks worldwide are in crisis, with more than 70 percent of
>commercially important stocks either over-exploited, depleted, or close to
>the maximum sustainable level of exploitation. Consumption of fish has
>increased by 240 percent since 1960.
>
>Will it make a difference?
>
>It could do. But the wording of the agreement is not particularly strong,
>and many fishing nations have so far strongly resisted tough controls.
>
>Other agreements:
>
>Significantly improve Africa's agricultural productivity and food security.
>3
>
>ENVIRONMENT
>
>Agreement:
>
>Commitment to significantly reduce biodiversity loss by 2010. 4
>
>How it was reached:
>
>Environmentalists were dismayed at the wording, which is less strong than 
>a resolution agreed at an international conference in April. The new,
>non-binding proposal is aimed at curbing the destruction of habitats such 
>as rainforests, wetlands and coral reefs, which is driving animal and plant
>species to extinction. The target was set despite resistance from the US 
>and the G77 group of developing countries, but remains weak and largely
>meaningless.
>
>Will it make a difference?
>
>Precious little in itself. There is nothing here but a vague and weak
>aspiration - and no concrete measures to make sure that the extinctions 
>are actually slowed.
>
>Other agreements:
>
>Support phasing out of lead in petrol, paint and other sources. 3
>
>Promote studies of heavy metals that are harmful to the environment. 4
>
>Develop a 10-year plan to ensure goods are produced and consumed in a way 
>that does not destroy the environment. 3
>
>Produce and use chemicals safely. 5
>
>POVERTY
>
>The agreements:
>
>Halve the number of the world's poor living on less than $1 a day by 2015. 3
>
>Significantly improve the lives of at least 100-million slum dwellers by
>2020. 4
>
>Establish a voluntary solidarity fund to wipe out poverty. 2
>
>How it was reached:
>
>The over-arching aim of the summit was to bridge the income gap between 
>the world's richest and poorest, while ensuring the environment is not 
>harmed in the process.
>
>But the sprawling agenda and divergent interests meant there were
>compromises aplenty in the summit agreement, some of which were attacked 
>by civic and environmental groups as significant steps backward from 
>previous commitments.
>
>Will it make a difference?
>
>Not a lot. The real goal - to halve dire poverty by 2015 - were decided by
>the Millennium Summit two years ago. The test will be whether countries 
>meet them.
>
>Other agreements:
>
>Support the full implementation of Nepad. 3
>
>Develop policies to improve the well-being of indigenous peoples. 3
>
>ENERGY
>
>Agreement:
>
>Agree on voluntary regional and national targets for access to renewable
>energy like solar, wind and wave energy. 2
>
>How it was reached:
>
>The summit failed to set any targets for increasing renewable energy, thus
>falling short of one of the most important yardsticks for success. It agreed
>to phase out harmful subsidies "where appropriate", but included passages 
>boosting nuclear power and fossil fuels that cause global warming.
>
>Attempts to increase the rate of renewable energy were stymied by 
>opposition from the world's major oil producers and biggest oil consumer, 
>the US.
>
>Ratifications to the Kyoto Protocol on climate change increased, and the
>agreed summit text says nations that have ratified Kyoto "strongly urge" 
>the other states to ratify it in "a timely manner".
>
>Will it make a difference?
>
>Not really, and could make things worse. But some developing countries 
>said they would press ahead with renewable energy anyway.
>
>Other agreement:
>
>Agree on the need for improvements to energy access so that all people
>should have access to conventional forms of energy. 3
>--------------------------------------------
>
>Let's make it happen together - Mbeki
>
>By Christelle Terreblanche
>
>President Thabo Mbeki has appealed to the international community to take 
>ownership of the decisions taken by world leaders over the last week 
>and  to act collectively.
>
>As the Johannesburg World Summit ended shortly before 9pm on Wednesday 
>with pledges to implement its commitments and targets amid many 
>compliments for the hosts, Mbeki also called for a review of the system of 
>global governance, of bodies such as the UN.
>
>"As governments we should not hesitate to interact with civil society,"
>summit chairperson Mbeki said. "This summit emphasises that we should
>maintain the development that we recognised here to think and act together."
>
>'If we don't attend to this, we will be depriving ourselves'
>He said that a system of global governance that responds more effectively 
>to the crisis on Earth was essential.
>
>"If we don't attend to this, we will be depriving ourselves of instruments
>we need to implement the decisions we take. Hopefully now that all of us
>came back to the cradle of mankind, we can go back to the world with a
>commitment to undo the damage we did."
>
>Later Mbeki again stressed that the critical issue of the conference was to
>make things happen, a responsibility particularly resting with the UN.
>
>He made it clear South Africa would keep a keen eye on the process, and
>would "frequently interact with the UN to ensure the decisions taken in
>Johannesburg were carried out".
>
>After the adoption of the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation and the
>Political Declaration, world leaders poured compliments on South Africa 
>for the success of the summit.
>
>After some last-minute haggling UN summit secretary-general Nitin Desai 
>said the UN had never seen a summit as well organised, despite the fact it 
>may have been the largest ever.
>
>The summit ended late after a hugely changed political declaration went to
>the plenary at about 6pm; after some last-minute haggling, two extra
>paragraphs were included. One of them makes a strong pledge to focus on 
>"the fight against the worldwide conditions that pose severe threats to 
>the sustainable development of our people".
>
>Among these are terrorism, foreign occupation, and chronic diseases, "in
>particular HIV/Aids, malaria and tuberculosis". All three were included in
>the draft declaration earlier drawn up by Mbeki in his capacity as
>chairperson, to form a basis for discussion.
>
>References to human rights were still missing in the final declaration.
>
>Mbeki said later the attempt to simplify the declaration had led to the
>omission of detail, but it was later felt some should be added again. He
>cautioned that the declaration should be read together with the
>implementation plan.
>
>Environment Minister Valli Moosa said it was felt the references in the
>implementation plan were sufficient, while the political declaration put
>emphasis on human dignity and general rights.
>-----------------------------------------
>
>Mbeki's 'inspiring' summit saluted
>
>A standing ovation for President Thabo Mbeki marked the closure of the 
>World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg on Wednesday night 
>as the curtain came down on a 10-day event hailed by delegates as "one of 
>the greatest international conferences ever" and "an inspiration for our 
>children".
>
>Noting that at the opening last Monday he had welcomed delegates to the
>Cradle of Humankind, Mbeki said he hoped they would return "with the
>conviction to undo the damage we've done to the world, to build the world 
>we visualised in the documents (agreed at the summit)...
>
>"Thanks for proving it possible to act in a spirit of human solidarity and
>unity to address matters that can only be solved in unity."
>
>In his closing remarks, Mbeki said decisions taken at the summit and at
>similar events at Doha, Monterrey and New York, all related to one
>"critically important" objective: the development of effective multilateral
>agreements between nations.
>
>"Clearly we have to look at this: how can we have a system of global
>governance to act better?
>
>"It's quite clear that if we don't attend to this matter, we will be
>depriving ourselves of instruments we need.
>
>"It's a big challenge, but I think it needs attending to."
>
>The closing session was delayed for about 45 minutes for last-minute
>negotiations over the draft Political Declaration.
>
>When it resumed, Mbeki - the summit chairman - explained that delegates 
>had objected to the first draft as containing too many details. But, after the
>shortened draft had been circulated, there had been last-minute objections 
>from some delegates who wanted to restore some detail.
>
>After further consultations, the shorter version was adopted.
>
>Earlier, there had been a surprisingly critical assessment by Venezuela, 
>on behalf of the Group of 77 countries and China.
>
>President Hugo Chavez told the plenary that UN summits had become an
>illogical and pre-determined "dialogue of the deaf" in which world leaders
>had no real impact on the final outcome.
>
>Chavez was highly critical of the traditional format of UN summits, where
>negotiating teams finalised most issues before the arrival of world 
>leaders. Because of this, the leaders had no real impact on the outcome, 
>which was illogical.
>
>"We have to have a radical change in the formats of these summits... There 
>is no proper dialogue, it seems to be a dialogue of the deaf.
>
>"Sometimes, those of us (heads of state) who stand up there, simply don't
>get listened to. We just read a speech, almost as a task which has been
>imposed on us.
>
>"So we have to radically transform the format, by coming to debate things
>and take decisions."
>
>But there were no critical voices at the final session.
>
>The representative of the United States said the summit had approved 
>"truly global documents".
>
>"(But if) words are good, actions are better... You have brought us to the
>brink of a new sustainability - the world is in your debt," he told Mbeki.
>
>The Japanese delegate said sustainable development was among the most 
>important goals for humanity in the 21st century - "Let us act and make it 
>happen".
>
>Denmark said the summit had been "one of the greatest international
>conferences ever", and Canada said it had been "an outstanding success" - 
>"It will be an inspiration for our children".
>
>Summit secretary-general Nitin Desai said delegates had to keep to the
>agreements made. "That has been the purpose of this summit - a summit of 
>action, of making things happen."

Gary Liss
916-652-7850
Fax: 916-652-0485

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