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[GreenYes] Olympic waste diversion hits a snag
FYI

> Welcome to Resource Recycling's electronic newsletter.  This edition
> includes 
> two stories.
> __________________________________________________
> 
> IS THE OLYMPIC RECYCLING EFFORT AWARD-WINNING?
> 
> PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP MOVES FORWARD IN EUROPE
> __________________________________________________
> 
> Is the Olympic recycling effort award-winning?
> 
> Although environmental groups and others have applauded efforts by the 
> 2002 Salt Lake City Organizing Committee to attain a "zero-waste" goal 
> as part of the operations of the February Winter Olympic Games, the
> evidence 
> to date suggests the acclaim may be premature.
> 
> Groups such as the GrassRoots Recycling Network (Athens, Georgia) say the 
> recycling and composting system attained a 96 percent waste reduction
> level. 
>  However, disturbing local reports in Utah suggest this announcement may 
> require revision.
> 
> Wasatch Energy Systems, the quasi-governmental agency that operates the 
> Davis County, Utah waste incinerator, has stepped in to manage some 2,600 
> tons of material generated at Olympic sites.  The material, which is
> stored 
> on WES property about a mile from the incinerator in Layton, will be used 
> to make compost or will be landfilled.  WES took over management after 
> Green Valley Recycle & Compost (Minneapolis), the contracted recycling 
> service provider, abandoned the composting project, with the concurrence 
> of SLOC.
> 
> According to published reports, WES is charging SLOC $38 per ton to handle
> 
> the material.  The agency expects to complete the composting activities 
> by September 2003.  Until then, SLOC will not know if it has attained its 
> 85 percent recycling and composting goal.
> 
> SLOC refuses to say how much it paid Green Valley.
> ____________________________________________________
> 
> Product stewardship moves forward in Europe
> 
> The European Parliament today approved a law requiring industry to finance
> 
> a massive takeback system for obsolete electronic and electrical goods.
> 
> The measure, which now goes to European Union member states, requires that
> 
> manufacturers establish recovery programs for products such as computers, 
> televisions, cellphones, radios and household appliances.  According to 
> industry estimates, this will cost as much as $13.2 billion annually ($US)
> 
> and will affect some 10,000 equipment producers.
> 
> The European Union will leave it to individual governments to figure out 
> the best way to establish recovery programs.  The member nations already 
> have agreed in principle to the takeback system.
> _________________________________________________
> 
> This e-mail newsletter is a new benefit of your subscription to Resource 
> Recycling magazine.  If you do not wish to receive future editions, simply
> 
> let us know.  Write to: info@resource-recycling.com.
> _________________________________________________
> 
> Resource Recycling Magazine
> P.O. Box 42270
> Portland, OR 97242-0270
> (503) 233-1305; 233-1356 (fax)
> info@resource-recycling.com
> www.resource-recycling.com
> 
> 
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