GreenYes Archives
[GreenYes Home] - [Thread Index] - [Date Index]
[Date Prev] - [Date Next] - [Thread Prev] - [Thread Next]

[GreenYes] San Francisco Passes Resolution Calling Batter EPR Inadequate
NOTE: THIS RESOLUTION PASSED SAN FRANCISCO'S 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS JULY 9, 2001, WITH A 
UNANIMOUS VOTE.

For immediate release: July 2, 2001

SUPERVISOR SANDOVAL TAKES ON TOXIC BATTERIES, 
INTRODUCES RESOLUTION URGING CITY TO USE 
RECHARGABLE BATTERIES, ORDINANCE ON THE WAY 

San Francisco will be on its way to reducing toxic heavy 
metals in landfill when city departments stop using non-
rechargeable batteries, and improve recycling. Supervisor 
Gerardo Sandoval will introduce a resolution today urging 
battery manufacturers and recyclers to help The City develop 
an expanded and affordable battery recycling program for 
City departments, and to develop a program to inform 
residents about battery toxicity and recycling opportunities. 
Supervisor Sandoval will introduce an ordinance requiring 
city departments to purchase rechargeable batteries 
whenever possible in coming months. 

"Non-rechargeable batteries are a waste of City money, a 
waste of natural resources, and a threat to our public health," 
said Supervisor Sandoval. "San Francisco should be a 
leader in resource conservation, not a leader in generating 
waste." 

Some rechargeable batteries can be recharged up to one 
thousand times, each one substituting for hundreds of single-
use batteries over its useful life. 

Most batteries contain heavy metals, including cadmium, 
mercury, silver, lead, nickel, and zinc. Health effects 
associated with ingestion or inhalation of water, food, or air 
that has been contaminated with high levels of these metals 
range from headaches and abdominal discomfort to 
seizures, cancer, comas, and even death. Cadmium is an 
acutely toxic metal and a known carcinogen that has been 
shown to affect lung, liver, and kidney damage, anemia, and 
decrease in male fertility. 

Batteries that contain heavy metals are considered toxic 
waste, but few batteries are disposed of correctly. Instead, 
the vast majority end up in landfill where metals can leach 
into the environment. 

"Recycling is an important part of the picture," said 
Sandoval. "When we use batteries, even rechargeable 
batteries, we need to make sure that they are taken out of 
the waste stream so they can't do any harm."

Supervisor Sandoval's resolution follows a resolution passed 
by San Francisco's Commission on the Environment, which 
urges restrictions on the use of non-rechargeable batteries 
in order to protect and preserve human and environmental 
health. 

http://www.sfgov.org/sfenvironment/
###

[GreenYes Home] - [Date Index] - [Thread Index]
[Date Prev] - [Date Next] - [Thread Prev] - [Thread Next]