RE: greenyes-d Digest V00 #6

From: Kris Hageman (KHageman@ci.plymouth.mn.us)
Date: Fri Jan 07 2000 - 16:59:17 EST

  • Next message: Bill Sheehan: "[GRRN] ALERT: GREEN RAUCOUS IN THE IOWA CAUCUS"

    Hello GreenYes:
    I am writing from Plymouth Minnesota. I am the Solid Waste Coordinator for
    the city and we are currently researching the use and potential purchase of
    a hybrid auto to include in our pool of city vehicles. I am looking for
    some information (facts/figures) on the benefits to using a ULEV auto. What
    is the reduction in pollution and ultimate effect on the green house gas
    effects. Given this is a California emission standard, anyone from CRRA
    have some figures available? Thanks for your help.
    Kris Hageman
    Khageman@ci.plymouth.mn.us

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: greenyes-d-request@earthsystems.org
    [mailto:greenyes-d-request@earthsystems.org]
                    Sent: Friday, January 07, 2000 5:00 AM
                    To: greenyes-d@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: greenyes-d Digest V00 #6

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --------
                    greenyes-d Digest Volume 00 :
    Issue 6

                    Today's Topics:
                      [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
    [ William P McGowan <kai@umail.ucsb.edu> ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
    [ Martin.Lawrence@epamail.epa.gov ]
                      Re: greenyes-d Digest V00 #5
    [ Tanis Skislak <tskisl@yahoo.com> ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
    [ "George Rutherford" <GeorgeR@NRC-Recycle.org> ]
                      [GRRN] Job opening: Recycling Assistant with Monterey
    County [ "Schkolnick, Karen Ext.4617" <schkolnickk@co.monterey.ca.us>
    ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
    [ RESRECYCLE@aol.com ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
    [ Pete Pasterz <ppasterz@pplant.msu.edu> ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
    [ Steve1092@aol.com ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
    [ Pat Franklin <CRI@Container-Recycling.org> ]
                      [GRRN] Online Discussion on CRT Recycling
    [ "Dawn Amore" <DawnA@NRC-Recycle.org> ]
                      [GRRN] Municipal recycling collections from apartments
    [ "Marjorie J. Clarke" <mclarke@shiva.hunter.cuny.edu> ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Coke [
    Myra Nissen <myracycl@inreach.com> ]
                      Re: [GRRN] Municipal recycling collections from
    apartments, NYC [ Steve1092@aol.com ]

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                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 07:26:35 -0800 (PST)
                    From: William P McGowan <kai@umail.ucsb.edu>
                    To: RecycleWorlds <anderson@msn.fullfeed.com>
                    cc: GreenYes <greenyes@earthsystems.org>
                    Subject: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
                    Message-ID:
    <Pine.GSO.3.96.1000106072422.4519A-100000@bergman.umail.ucsb.edu>
                    Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

                    I noticed yesterday in the WSJ that Coca Cola is returning
    to glass
                    bottles to rejuventae its old image--the bottles will be the
    same green
                    glass variety that Coke always used in its "Classic" look.

                    For all the uproar over Coke going to plastic, one would
    think the
                    environmental community would cheer this development. But
    maybe this good
                    news would get in the way of organizing yet another boycott,
    etc.

                    --
                    William P. McGowan
                    UCSB History/Rincon Recycling
                    805-240-3448/805-658-6526-FAX
                    kai@umail.ucsb.edu

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 10:47:15 -0500
                    From: Martin.Lawrence@epamail.epa.gov
                    To: kai@umail.ucsb.edu
                    Cc: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
                    Message-id: <8525685E.00565EC6.00@EPAHUB9.RTPTOK.EPA.GOV>
                    Content-type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
                    Content-disposition: inline

                    Yea! Hurray. Lets cancel the boycot right away and give
    Coke a big advertising
                    award.
                    Coke has always kept their product in bottles, and they look
    just like the ones
                    that used to be returnable
                    for refund, but of course no longer are. Less than 1% of
    their product I'd
                    guess, but does anyone know for
                    certain?

                    Larry Martin

                    kai@umail.ucsb.edu on 01/06/2000 10:26:35 AM

                    To: anderson@msn.fullfeed.com
                    cc: greenyes@earthsystems.org

                    Subject: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass

                    I noticed yesterday in the WSJ that Coca Cola is returning
    to glass
                    bottles to rejuventae its old image--the bottles will be the
    same green
                    glass variety that Coke always used in its "Classic" look.

                    For all the uproar over Coke going to plastic, one would
    think the
                    environmental community would cheer this development. But
    maybe this good
                    news would get in the way of organizing yet another boycott,
    etc.

                    --
                    William P. McGowan
                    UCSB History/Rincon Recycling
                    805-240-3448/805-658-6526-FAX
                    kai@umail.ucsb.edu

                    *****************************************************
                        To post to the greenyes list, send a letter to:
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                    ******************************************************

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 08:29:34 -0800 (PST)
                    From: Tanis Skislak <tskisl@yahoo.com>
                    To: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: Re: greenyes-d Digest V00 #5
                    Message-ID:
    <20000106162934.16898.qmail@web111.yahoomail.com>
                    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

                    Regarding the Washington Post article, over the
                    years I have heard Mr. Porter make some strange
                    comments but luckily, the audience has either
                    been small enough or astute enough that the
                    damage is controllable. Given his credentials,
                    one would think that a person in Mr. Porter's
                    position would know better. Living up to last
                    year's resolution to be kinder, I could suppose
                    that his comments were taken out of context by
                    the reporter. Living up to this year's
                    resolution that it is easier to accomplish my
                    goal if the goal is to bring everyone else down
                    to my level, I could suppose that this is just
                    what Mr. Porter said. Alas, when I put these
                    comments into the context of the others, I must
                    conclude that he did indeed say that.His comments
                    in this vast arena give me the shivers and I was
                    wondering if anyone else had the same reaction.

                    Maybe we just need a simple fact sheet on
                    recycling that addresses the basic issues of 1.
                    What does recycling cost? 2. What does trash
                    cost? 3. What is included in "cost?" 4. Why is
                    the easier and cheaper way the "better" way? 5.
                    What is "better" anyway? Better for whom, better
                    when, better than what? 6. Is the value of
                    recycling absolute or is it on a continuum? Is
                    the value measured discretely by each local
                    government involved in collection programs or is
                    it to be measured in the regional, statewide,
                    national and global aggregate? 7. Is the benefit
                    to be measured in the short term (as in "I must
                    have money in the bank: I have still have
                    checks!) or is it to be measured in the long
                    terms (as in mutual funds when we have to stay in
                    it for the long term if we want a return on our
                    investment). 8. If the process of recycling
                    produces pollution, isn't there a baseline
                    against which the amount of pollution should be
                    measured or are we again looking at an "absolute"
                    versus "relative" impact.

                    After I read Mr. Porter's comments about having
                    already captured the "easy -to-get stuff" and his
                    query of whether we really want to collect and
                    recycle "hot dog wrappers and kitty litter" I
                    then came across an article by Chaz Miller in
                    which he is discussing the "value" of recycling
                    and makes a comment about the "law of diminishing
                    returns." I respect Mr. Miller and have for a
                    long time so I am not trying to put him into an
                    association with Mr. Porter. I mention Chaz
                    because the concept of the law of diminishing
                    returns is more appropriate when examining the
                    dregs of a program or the dregs of a population
                    base and you try to determine if the financial
                    cost outweighs the environmental benefit. It
                    seems to me that Mr. Porter has started in on the
                    law of diminishing returns not in relation to the
                    dregs of the program but way before the national
                    apex has been reached.

                    These little wars keep cropping up because we do
                    not have a united vision on recycling. It's a
                    large country and we are very fragmented. I see
                    the division as analogous to democrats versus
                    republicans. The republicans ask "what is the
                    immediate financial cost?" and the democrats tend
                    to reply "who cares,it's for kids and grandkids."
                     Neither side validates the other's view and the
                    dichotomy continues. When do we get to a party
                    of "demolicans" or "republicrats" who agree that
                    it is inherently wrong to waste our resources
                    just because we can and because it is easier?
                    When do we agree that "cost" is not simply a
                    matter of dollars? When do we agree that the
                    philosphy of recycling is good because it is a
                    long-term strategy based on conservation of what
                    we have? When do we agree that when dealing with
                    the dregs, it does not make sense to go after the
                    small amounts be they small amounts of materials
                    in small communities or be they small amounts
                    left over after the majority has been recycled.

                    Maybe there is one party that will come out of
                    this all: the Redems. Now there's an idea!
                    Tanis Skislak
                    __________________________________________________
                    Do You Yahoo!?
                    Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger.
                    http://im.yahoo.com

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 11:47:09 -0400
                    From: "George Rutherford" <GeorgeR@NRC-Recycle.org>
                    To: RecycleWorlds <anderson@msn.fullfeed.com>,
                            William P McGowan <kai@umail.ucsb.edu>
                    CC: GreenYes <greenyes@earthsystems.org>
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
                    Message-Id: <200001061646.LAA10948@hq.capu.net>
                    Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
                    Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

                    That is certainly good news especially considering that
    glass
                    typically has a fair of amount of recycled content. Now
    let's hope
                    that the distribution is widespread.

    > I noticed yesterday in the WSJ that Coca Cola is returning
    to glass
    > bottles to rejuventae its old image--the bottles will be
    the same green
    > glass variety that Coke always used in its "Classic" look.
    >
    > For all the uproar over Coke going to plastic, one would
    think the
    > environmental community would cheer this development. But
    maybe this good
    > news would get in the way of organizing yet another
    boycott, etc.
    >
    >
    > --
    > William P. McGowan
    > UCSB History/Rincon Recycling
    > 805-240-3448/805-658-6526-FAX
    > kai@umail.ucsb.edu
    >
    > *****************************************************
    > To post to the greenyes list, send a letter to:
    > greenyes@earthsystems.org
    > To unsubscribe, send a message to:
    > greenyes-request@earthsystems.org with the subject
    > unsubscribe. If you have any problems, please
    > write to www@earthsystems.org.
    > GreenYes is archived on the GrassRoots Recycling
    > Network web site: http://www.grrn.org
    > ******************************************************
    >

                    =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
                    George Rutherford
                    America Recycles Day, Inc.
                    1727 King Street #105
                    Alexandria, VA 22314-2720
                    Phone (703) 683-1605 or 683-9025 x226
                    FAX (703) 683-0031
                    georger@nrc-recycle.org

                    Check out www.americarecyclesday.org

                    America Recycles Day [November 15th] was lots of fun.

                    ARD 2000 is on its way....Are you ready??? Why not get
    involved?

                    For Our Children's Future... Buy Recycled TODAY
                    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 09:11:25 -0800
                    From: "Schkolnick, Karen Ext.4617"
    <schkolnickk@co.monterey.ca.us>
                    To: "'greenyes@earthsystems.org'"
    <greenyes@earthsystems.org>
                    Subject: [GRRN] Job opening: Recycling Assistant with
    Monterey County
                    Message-ID:
    <6AD22DE28B98D3118133400008193046435E0B@co.monterey.ca.us>
                    Content-Type: text/plain;
                            charset="iso-8859-1"

                    Please post this announcement:

                    RECYCLING & RESOURCE RECOVERY ASSISTANT: $15.57 -
    $19.27 /hourly.
                    The Environmental Health Division of the Monterey County
    Health Department
                    is looking for qualified individuals to assist in
    coordinating,
                    implementing, and monitoring waste reduction and recycling
    programs for
                    residents of single and multi-family dwellings, industries,
    institutions,
                    commercial establishments and local government. Currently,
    there are
                    openings for two full-time temporary positions. The list
    established by
                    this recruitment may be used to fill future benefited
    positions. We
                    anticipate conducting selection interviews during the week
    of February 14,
                    2000.

                    TO APPLY: Application materials may be obtained at:
    Monterey County
                    Salinas Courthouse, Human Resources Division, 240 Church
    Street, Room 218,
                    P.O. Box 1877, Salinas, CA 93902 or by calling (831)
    755-5116. Submit a
                    completed Monterey County Application and response to the
    Supplemental
                    Questions to the Monterey County Human Resources Division by
    the final
                    filing date. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of the
    required
                    application materials.
                    FINAL FILING DATE: Friday, January 28, 2000 by 5:00 P.M.
    (Postmarks and
                    faxes not accepted)

                    Karen Schkolnick
                    Monterey County
                    (831) 755-4617
                    schkolnickk@co.monterey.ca.us

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 12:55:52 EST
                    From: RESRECYCLE@aol.com
                    To: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
                    Message-ID: <40.40357408.25a63128@aol.com>
                    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
                    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

                    Some facts on the Coke bottle. It is mainly for promotional
    purposes (e.g.,
                    it will first be linked to the Super Bowl ads, etc.) and is
    tied to the
                    relaunching of Coke Classic. They'll give away one million
    cold sodas in
                    glass at movie theaters, shopping malls, etc. It will then
    be sold in 75
                    metropolitan areas, but mostly in cold cases at convenience
    markets. Thus,
                    the vast majority of Coke will still be marketed in plastic
    and aluminum.

                    Jerry Powell
                    Editor
                    Container Recycling Report

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 13:51:45 -0500
                    From: Pete Pasterz <ppasterz@pplant.msu.edu>
                    To: Martin.Lawrence@epamail.epa.gov, kai@umail.ucsb.edu
                    Cc: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
                    Message-Id: <s8749e10.006@pplant.msu.edu>
                    Content-Type: text/plain
                    Content-Disposition: inline

                    Larry--

                    I agree with the sentiment, but to be "technically correct",
    they are returnable for deposit in the 10 states and 1 municipality which
    REQUIRE them to do so. The more important issue, and I'm sure is what you
    were alluding to is that these "designer/image" bottles are not REFILLABLE,
    and thus do not yield the environmental benefits of multi-use; even better
    net energy savings than any transport gains of use of plastic.

                    And, the 6-packs in our area are about $4 for 48 TOTAL
    ounces of product!! Usually, the 8 packs of 20 oz plastic bottles are on
    "sale" for $2.50--about 25% of the cost per ounce! Quite an economic
    disincentive to buy the recycled/recyclable one-use glass! No wonder they
    can claim that the consumers overwhelming choice is for plastic!

                    Pete Pasterz

    >>> <Martin.Lawrence@epamail.epa.gov> 01/06/00 10:44AM >>>

                    Yea! Hurray. Lets cancel the boycot right away and give
    Coke a big advertising
                    award.
                    Coke has always kept their product in bottles, and they look
    just like the ones
                    that used to be returnable
                    for refund, but of course no longer are. Less than 1% of
    their product I'd
                    guess, but does anyone know for
                    certain?

                    Larry Martin

                    kai@umail.ucsb.edu on 01/06/2000 10:26:35 AM

                    To: anderson@msn.fullfeed.com
                    cc: greenyes@earthsystems.org

                    Subject: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass

                    I noticed yesterday in the WSJ that Coca Cola is returning
    to glass
                    bottles to rejuventae its old image--the bottles will be the
    same green
                    glass variety that Coke always used in its "Classic" look.

                    For all the uproar over Coke going to plastic, one would
    think the
                    environmental community would cheer this development. But
    maybe this good
                    news would get in the way of organizing yet another boycott,
    etc.

            
    !
            
    !
            

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 14:26:03 EST
                    From: Steve1092@aol.com
                    To: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
                    Message-ID: <79.795423c4.25a6464b@aol.com>
                    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
                    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

                    I prefer aluminum cans myself over glass and plastic, which
    is most commonly recycled. Canned sodas can often be found on sale and
    doesn't shatter as glass does. While we're speaking of packaging, 6 pack
    rings, and 12/24 pack paperboard is difficult to recycle. Are #4(LDPE)
    plastic rings recyclable with #4(LDPE) plastic grocery bags?

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 15:17:25 -0800
                    From: Pat Franklin <CRI@Container-Recycling.org>
                    To: GreenYes <greenyes@earthsystems.org>
                    Cc: William P McGowan <kai@umail.ucsb.edu>
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Coke is back in glass
                    Message-Id:
    <3.0.6.32.20000106151725.00793a30@pop.mindspring.com>
                    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

                    Someone can correct me if I'm wrong. I believe that while
    the these
                    'classic' hourglass glass bottle LOOK like the old fashioned
    returnable
                    glass bottles, Coke is not taking them back for refilling.
    These bottles
                    are more wasteful than the one-way stubby Coke bottles of
    not-to-distant
                    past because they are heavier than the stubbies. What is
    worse -- they are
                    actually refillable bottles that Coke refuses to refill.

                    This is hardly a step in the right direction and certainly
    nothing to cheer
                    about. In fact, it might qualify as the first BOO of the
    21st century,
                    except that they've been marketing this no-return, classic
    bottle for
                    several years.

                    Hold your cheers!!!!!

                    Pat Franklin
                    Container Recycling Institute

                    -----

                    At 07:26 AM 1/6/00 -0800, you wrote:
    >I noticed yesterday in the WSJ that Coca Cola is returning
    to glass
    >bottles to rejuventae its old image--the bottles will be
    the same green
    >glass variety that Coke always used in its "Classic" look.
    >
    >For all the uproar over Coke going to plastic, one would
    think the
    >environmental community would cheer this development. But
    maybe this good
    >news would get in the way of organizing yet another
    boycott, etc.
    >
    >
    >--
    >William P. McGowan
    >UCSB History/Rincon Recycling
    >805-240-3448/805-658-6526-FAX
    >kai@umail.ucsb.edu
    >
    >*****************************************************
    > To post to the greenyes list, send a letter to:
    >greenyes@earthsystems.org
    > To unsubscribe, send a message to:
    >greenyes-request@earthsystems.org with the subject
    >unsubscribe. If you have any problems, please
    >write to www@earthsystems.org.
    > GreenYes is archived on the GrassRoots Recycling
    >Network web site: http://www.grrn.org
    >******************************************************
    >
    >
                    Pat Franklin
                    Executive Director
                    Container Recycling Institute
                    1911 Ft Myer Drive, Suite 900
                    Arlington, Virginia 22209
                    703.276.9800 fax 276-9587
                    CRI@Container-Recycling.org
                    www.Container-Recycling.org

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 16:54:09 -0500
                    From: "Dawn Amore" <DawnA@NRC-Recycle.org>
                    To: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: [GRRN] Online Discussion on CRT Recycling
                    Message-Id: <200001062153.QAA04726@hq.capu.net>
                    Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
                    Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

                    NRC's next online discussion on electronics recycling will
    be as
                    follows:

                    - Proper Management of Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs)
                    Thursday, January 13 at 2:00 p.m. ET (11:00 a.m. PT) to 3:30
    p.m.
                    (Discussions are now 90 minutes.)

                    NRC has invited several experts and posted several documents
    on
                    CRT management, which will give you an overview of different

                    strategies. Please read through the documents and come to
    the
                    discussion prepared with your questions. (Questions may
    also be
                    posted in advance to the message board in the forum.) You
    may
                    access the documents, message board, and chat room through
    the
                    following website:

                    http://www.nrc-recycle.org/Programs/electronics/online.htm

                    Several people have experienced problems in accessing the
    chat
                    room. PLEASE TEST YOUR ACCESS TO THE CHAT ROOM IN
                    ADVANCE. If you continue to have problems, please follow
    the
                    instructions found on the following website:

            
    http://www.nrc-recycle.org/Programs/electronics/usernotes.htm

                    We look forward to your participation.

                    Later in January:
                    - Proper Management of End-of-Life Electronic Products
    (other than
                    CRTs)
                    Thursday, January 27 at 2:00 p.m. ET (11:00 a.m. PT) to 3:30
    p.m.

                    ====================================
                    Dawn Amore
                    National Recycling Coalition
                    1727 King Street, Suite 105
                    Alexandria, VA 22314-2720
                    Phone: (703) 683-9025, ext. 205
                    Fax: (703) 683-9026
                    E-mail: dawna@nrc-recycle.org

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2000 11:31:00 -0500
                    From: "Marjorie J. Clarke" <mclarke@shiva.hunter.cuny.edu>
                    To: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: [GRRN] Municipal recycling collections from
    apartments
                    Message-Id:
    <4.2.0.58.20000104112547.01529b50@shiva.hunter.cuny.edu>
                    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

                    Viv wanted to know:

                    Please let me know of towns that provide recycling and trash
    service
    > to all condos and apartment buildings (in or outside of
    > Massachusetts).

                    New York City Dept of Sanitation collects garbage and
    recyclables from all
                    residential buildings (all sizes) and institutions in the
    City. These are
                    collected on the same routes, irrespective of size (i.e.
    they don't have
                    special routes for special buildings, with one exception:
    there is a
                    containerized recycling program where dumpsters are issued
    to especially
                    large apartment buildings). Recyclables have been collected
    from apartment
                    buildings since 1988. The current overall diversion rate of
    the
                    residential recycling program (all sizes of buildings) is
    just under 20%.

                    Maggie Clarke, Ph.D.
                    Instructor, Rutgers University Geography Dept.

                    http://everest.hunter.cuny.edu/~mclarke/index.htm
                    New York City Phone & Fax: 212-567-8272

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 15:41:19 -0700
                    From: Myra Nissen <myracycl@inreach.com>
                    To: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Coke
                    Message-ID: <38751A0F.1F34@inreach.com>
                    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
                    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

                    I just heard on the radio that the National Endowment for
    the Arts is
                    funding an anthropologist to New Guinea to study the
    cultural and
                    sociological implications of Coke.

                    That would be a study to read... it would give more
    understanding to the
                    popularity of Coke and perhaps ammunition to the cause.

                    Myra Nissen

            
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

                    Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 21:55:03 EST
                    From: Steve1092@aol.com
                    To: greenyes@earthsystems.org
                    Subject: Re: [GRRN] Municipal recycling collections from
    apartments, NYC
                    Message-ID: <87.878fafc7.25a6af87@aol.com>
                    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
                    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

                    Extensive information regarding New York City's recycling
    program is
                    available on their webpage at <A
            
    HREF="http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/dos/html/bw_home/index.html">http://www.c
    i.
                    nyc.ny.us/html/dos/html/bw_home/index.html</A>

            
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                    End of greenyes-d Digest V00 Issue #6
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